Chalk Hill Blue butterflies

How to identify Apart from the very rare large blue, the chalkhill blue is our largest blue butterfly. Males are silvery-blue with a dark brown border and a white fringe on the wings. The females are brown with a white fringe to the wings and a blue dusting near the body. They look similar to common blue females, but are larger and have chequered wing fringes. The orange wing spots are also less obvious in the female chalkhill blue. As its name suggests, the Chalk Hill Blue is found on chalk downland, although limestone downland is also used. The adult … Read more

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Brown Argus Butterfly

Brown Hairstreak Obsession The Brown Hairstreak is one of our most elusive yet most conspicuous butterflies. The adult is rarely seen but the egg is easily found.It is an attractive butterfly, the female especially delightful with a warm golden underside with a patch of the same striking hue on the upper-side of the fore-wings. Aside from the golden patch the upper-sides are dark brown. Males look similar, but the underside gold is paler and the fore-wing patch paler and reduced or absent. The reddish-gold tails on the hind-wings add to its charms. The legs are a striking white, resembling starched … Read more

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Brown Argus Butterfly

  The Brown argus favours open, chalk and limestone grasslands, but can also be spotted on coastal dunes, in woodland clearings and along disused railways.   The Brown argus is a small butterfly that is on the wing throughout the summer, between May and September. Adults feed on Common Rock-rose, which is also the caterpillars’ foodplant, together with various species like Crane’s-bills. The Brown argus is found in dry, sunny and open habitats, including heathland and downland, and seems to be expanding its range as the climate warms up.   How to identify   The Brown argus has bronzy-brown upperwings with an orange band … Read more

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Brimstone Butterfly

How rare is a brimstone butterfly? Usually seen in ones or twos, they are never very common, but are widespread. They can be found in damp woodlands, along sunny, woodland rides and mature hedgerows, and in large gardens. Why is it called a brimstone butterfly? The brimstone is thought to be the original butterfly, named for the yellow colour of the male. Brimstone is an old name for sulphur, the colour which perfectly matches the male’s wings. The brimstone is sexually dimorphic, meaning males and females are different. What are the predators of the brimstone butterfly? Predators. Like most woodland … Read more

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Black Hairstreak Butterfly

  The Black Hairstreak is one of our most elusive butterflies, foundonly in thickets of Blackthorn in woodlands on heavy clay soilsbetween Oxford and Peterborough in the East Midlands of England.The adults spend nearly all their time in the canopies of trees ordense scrub where they feed on honeydew secreted by aphids.At certain times they make short looping flights in and out of thetree tops. Butterflies can be seen from early morning to earlyevening with a peak of activity around midday. The adults areeasy to confuse with those of the White-letter Hairstreak andPurple Hairstreak which fly at the same time of … Read more

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Adonis Blue bellargus

  Life cycle   There are two broods per year, with adults flying from mid-May to mid-June, andearly August to mid-September. The eggs are laid singly on very small foodplantsgrowing in short turf. These conditions provide a very warm microclimate for larvaldevelopment and are favoured by ants, which tend both larvae and pupae. The greenlarvae are well camouflaged and are nearly always attended by ants, which are attractedby secretions from special ‘honey’ glands and pores. Any ant species appears suitable,but the most common are the red ant Myrmica sabuleti and the small black antLasius alienus. The ants protect the larvae from predators … Read more

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Adonis Blue

10 Fascinating Facts About Butterflies

  1:Butterfly Wings Are Transparent   How can that be? We know butterflies as perhaps the most colorful, vibrant insects around! Well, a butterfly’s wings are covered by thousands of tiny scales, and these scales reflect light in different colors. But underneath all of those scales, a butterfly wing is actually formed by layers of chitin—the same protein that makes up an insect’s exoskeleton. These layers are so thin you can see right through them. As a butterfly ages, scales fall off the wings, leaving spots of transparency where the chitin layer is exposed.   2:Butterflies Taste With Their Feet   Butterflies have taste … Read more

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How to attract butterflies to your garden

Butterflies are a common sight in gardens, but several species are in decline as they battle habitat loss.Here are some simple steps you can take to make your garden, patio or windowsill a little more homely for visiting butterflies, and encourage them to move in permanently. Add A Butterfly House We’re all familiar with the bug hotel and have seen plenty of bird box ideas, however, you might be less familiar with the butterfly box. This box is a great and easy way to learn how to attract butterflies to your garden. The butterfly box is similar to a traditional … Read more

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what do monarch butterflies eat

  What Do Monarch Butterflies Eat?   Monarchs eat several times a day to keep their energy up, though if food is scarce or the weather is bad, they can go a day or so without food. These butterflies mainly eat nectar from flowers. Most people associate monarchs with milkweed, and it’s true that their caterpillars dine exclusively on the leaves of these plants. Adult monarchs, however, will eat from a wide array of nectar plants, including the flowers of milkweed. Other favorite monarch flowers include sunflower, coneflower, ironweed, zinnia, lantana, penta, salvia, and many more.   Do Monarch Butterflies Eat Fruit?   Sometimes … Read more

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monarch butterflies

Brimstone | Common brimstone

Gonepteryx rhamni, commonly named the common brimstone, is a butterfly of the family Pieridae. It lives throughout the Palearctic zone and is commonly found across Europe, Asia, and North Africa. Across much of its range, it is the only species of its genus, and is therefore simply known locally as the brimstone. Its wing span size is 60–74 mm (2.4–2.9 in). It should not be confused with the brimstone moth Opisthograptis luteolata. The brimstone relies on two species of buckthorn plants as host plants for its larvae; this influences its geographic range and distribution, as these plants are commonly found … Read more

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Common brimstone